PRICE

€ 12.500

WATCH SCORE

9,8 / 10

KEY FEATURES

Extremely rare full gold version

Unworn condition

SERVICES INCLUDED

CERTIFICATION REPORT

BLOCKCHAIN CERTIFICATE

APPRAISAL BOOK

EXTRACT OF ARCHIVES

This model is an extremely rare example of Omega Electroquartz f8192Hz in solid yellow gold.

It has an asymmetrical case which improves the legibility of the watch on the wrist, similarly to the driver’s pieces produced in the 1930’s.

The crown is on the left side of the case to increase the comfort.

The dial, made of solid gold as confirmed by the “OM” (for “or massif”) on each side of the Swiss made signature at 6 o’clock, adds the final touch of luxury to the piece It has a red date wheel and red seconds hand with black enamel hour and minute hands.

The watch is in like unworn condition. The semi-integrated (detachable) yellow gold bracelet is perfect.

Note: these watches had a hefty price of 2200 USD at time of introduction , wereas a steel Speedmaster had a 180 USD price and a steel Beta 21 around 600 USD…

About the model

In the early 1970s, the watch world was about to be blown away by the cheap Japanese quartz watches. 20 Swiss watch companies collaborated together to create the Beta 21 movement. Swiss watch manufacturers were hoping their version of quartz technology would be their silver bullet against the imminent threat that was the Japanese quartz movements developed by Seiko. The Swiss conglomerate was composed of Bulova, IWC, JLC, Longines, Patek Philippe, Rolex and most famously Omega.

As mentioned in the Omega documentation from the early 1970s, this caliber is called “f8192Hz” because it is controlled by a tiny bar of quartz which, when stimulated by an electric current from its mercury power cell, vibrates precisely at 8,192 times per second. The significance of high speed vibration is simply this: the more finely it splits the second, the more accurate the watch becomes. A micro-miniaturised integrated circuit reduces the 8,192 vibrations to the slow pace of the hands of the watch and the practical result is a degree of accuracy unprecedented in modern timekeeping: within 5 seconds a month.